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What To Do After a Car Accident

- Monday, January 25, 2021

Whether you've gotten into a fender bender or totaled your car, accidents are scary. No matter the cause – weather and road conditions, irresponsible driving behavior, or something unforeseen – you should be prepared for any possibility. Even the most careful drivers can be involved in an accident, which is why we've provided these nine tips to help you get through an accident safely:

Check yourself and any passengers for injuries.

If you don't know whether a particular injury is serious, call 911 just in case.

Remain calm.

This one is easier said than done, but try to remain calm and take deep breaths to keep a clear head during this experience – there may be details you'll need to remember later you'll only recall if you were calm. If the accident was caused by another party, try to keep your cool and be polite.

Get moving.

If the accident was minor, move all cars involved to a safe place out of traffic. If the accident was more serious but you seem well enough to move, bring yourself and any other people involved to the side of the road, away from oncoming traffic. However, if you doubt the well-being of yourself or someone else involved, LEAVE THEM THERE. It may sound counter-intuitive, but moving someone while they're in a fragile state can cause even more harm – let the professionals handle the situation as they see fit.

If you doubt the well-being of yourself or someone else involved, be sure to alert emergency officials and follow their advice if it's to leave them there! Moving someone while they're in a fragile state can cause even more harm.

Take proper safety precautions.

Turn on your hazard lights and, if you have them, use cones to mark off the area. Carrying emergency flares in your trunk is a great idea to ensure that people can see you in the event of an accident.

Call the police.

Once everyone involved is as safe as they can be, call the police and inform them of the accident. For accidents like a fender bender, you're probably better off calling the non-emergency line in your area. If any kind of serious collision occurred, call 911 as soon as you can to make a full report and get the help you need.

Take a picture.

If you can, snap a few photos of each of the cars involved, including the license plate. This will protect you against fraudulent claims from the other people affected.

Exchange information.

Collect as much information as you can about the other parties involved, including the driver's name, address, phone number, insurance company, policy number, driver's license number and license plate number. If you feel that you caused the accident, do not claim fault with the other party - it makes things more difficult for you later!

Stay put.

No one should leave the scene of the accident until the police have arrived and you have filed a report. In most states, it's actually illegal to leave the scene of an accident, so stay where you are and wait for further instruction from the authorities.

Notify your insurance provider.

Report a claim with Lallis & Higgins Insurance, find your insurance carrier here or call 781-561-9031 for further assistance.

Stay safe out there and be prepared for whatever comes your way.

Source: foremost.com


Helpful Tips for New Drivers

- Monday, January 18, 2021
Lallis & Higgins Insurance, Quincy, Weymouth, MA

If you have a teen that just passed their driver's test or are currently in driver's education, remember that this moment is an important, life-changing accomplishment for them. Even though you won't be physically by their side when they're behind the wheel, you can still offer them your support and driving wisdom beforehand.

According to the CDC, vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the U.S. It's scary and the last thing you want to imagine, so it's important to make sure they're truly prepared for driving.

Thankfully, you can guide your teen to ensure their driving experience is as safe as possible with these helpful tips:

  • Follow the speed limit. I t's an obvious one. But when you go too fast, you have less time to stop or react. Speeding is one of the leading causes of teenage accidents. Another obvious and important reminder – always wear your seatbelt! According to the CDC, wearing a seat belt can lower the risk of death in car accidents by nearly 50%.
  • Make sure your seat is adjusted properly to your height. This is very important because if you can't see through your rear view mirror, it can affect your driving. A good way to tell if the mirror is in the right spot is if you can see the headlights of the car behind you. Also, make sure to adjust your door mirrors on the drivers and passenger side.
  • Keep that windshield clean. Keeping your car clean isn't just about style. In the morning and evening, light reflecting off a dirty windshield can temporarily blind you while you're driving.
  • Always check your blind spot. Thoughtlessly changing lanes can lead to a dangerous situation, especially with smaller vehicles like motorcycles.
  • Use your turn signals. Whether you're turning or changing lanes, you need to give the car behind you enough time to react.
  • Be cautious for aggressive drivers. If you do encounter an angry driver, back off and give them space on the road. The best thing is to stay calm to avoid getting into an accident with this person, or another driver on the road.
  • Don't use cruise control in the rain or snow. Using this feature during heavy rain, snow or ice can cause you to lose control of your vehicle.
  • Keep your hands on the wheel, and off your cell phone! Texting and driving has become the number one distraction for teens and adults. A text isn't worth anyone's life, and each time you take your eyes off the road, you put yourself and others at risk. Another reason to keep your eyes on your phone – you will get a ticket! According to the Governors Highway Safety Association, 47 states have banned text messaging for drivers. If you get caught, you may get slapped with a big fine, and get points on your driving record. A good way to avoid this is to keep your phone in a place that you can't reach while you're driving.

For the first few weeks, it might be a good idea to have your teen start off with small trips that are less than five miles away. It will help build confidence, and allow them to get more comfortable with driving alone. If you're still nervous, there are other options you can look into, such as a GPS tracking device or smartphone apps that will monitor location and driving speeds. Plus, larger automakers have actually installed systems in their new models that allow parents to set limits on speed and drive time, so keep an eye out for those.

Source: foremost.com


Preparing for Winter Driving – How to Drive in Snow and Ice

- Friday, January 08, 2021
Lallis & Higgins Insurance - Car Insurance

The three key elements to safe winter driving are:

  • Stay alert;
  • Slow down; and
  • Stay in control

It is best to winterize your vehicle before winter strikes. Schedule a maintenance check-up for the vehicle's tires and tire pressure, battery, belts and hoses, radiator, oil, lights, brakes, exhaust system, heater/defroster, wipers and ignition system. Keep your gas tank sufficiently full - at least half a tank is recommended. Depending upon where you drive, you may consider using winter tires or tire chains.

Winter driving conditions such as rain, snow, and ice dramatically affect the braking distance of a vehicle. The driver's capability to complete a smooth and safe stop is severely limited due to reduced tire traction. In order to stop safely, the vehicle's wheels must maintain traction by remaining on contact with the road surface while rolling, referred to as "rolling traction." When handling slippery winter roads, the keys to safety are slower speeds, gentler stops and turns, and increased following distances. It is recommended that drivers reduce their speed to half the posted speed limit or less under snowy road conditions.

Don't try to stretch more miles from your tires during the winter months. If your tread depth is getting low, it can have serious effects on dry pavement, but those effects are multiplied in wet and snowy conditions. When in doubt, get new tires.

Tire pressure usually lowers itself in winter and raises itself in summer. Under-inflated tires can cause a car to react more slowly to steering. Every time the outside temperature drops ten degrees, the air pressure inside your tires goes down about one or two PSI. Tires lose air normally through the process of permeation. Drivers should check their tire pressures frequently during cold weather, adding enough air to keep themat recommended levels of inflation at all times.

Sand and salt play a big role in keeping roads safe. The spreading of road salt prevents snow and ice from bonding to the road surface, which is why salt is usually spread early in a storm to prevent snow build-up and to aid in snow removal operations.

Unlike salt, sand does not melt and therefore helps by providing traction on slippery surfaces. Sand is often used when temperatures are too low for salt to be effective or at higher temperatures for immediate traction, particularly on hills, curves, bridges, intersections and on snow-packed roads.

Caution must be used when snowplows are on the roadways as snowplows and salt and sand trucks travel much slower than regular traffic. Passing a snowplow can be extremely dangerous as sight lines and visibility near a working snowplow are severely restricted by blowing snow.

Roads are typically cooler in shady areas and drivers may encounter another extremely dangerous element known as "black ice." Always slow down your vehicle when you see shady areas under these types of conditions.

Here are some safe-driving tips that will help you when roads are slick with ice or snow:

  • Get the feel of the road by starting out slowly and testing your steering control and braking ability. Avoid spinning your tires when you start by gently pressing your gas pedal until the car starts to roll. Start slowing down at least three times sooner than you normally would when turning or stopping.
  • Equip your vehicle with chains or snow tires. Chains are by far the most effective, and they should be used where ice and snow remain on the roadway. Remember that snow tires will slide on ice or packed snow so keep your distance.
  • Reduce your speed to correspond with conditions. There is no such thing as a "safe" speed range at which you may drive on snow or ice. You must be extremely cautious until you are able to determine how much traction you can expect from your tires.
  • When stopping, avoid sudden movements of the steering wheel and pump the brake gently. Avoid locking of brakes on glazed ice as it will cause a loss of steering and control. Every city block and every mile of highway may be different, depending upon sun or shade and the surface of the roadway. (Check your vehicle owner's manual, if the vehicle has anti-lock brakes, you may apply steady pressure to the brake pedal.)
  • Maintain a safe interval between you and the car ahead of you according to the conditions of the pavement. Many needless rear-end crashes occur on icy streets because drivers forget to leave stopping space.
  • Keep your vehicle in the best possible driving condition. The lights, tires, brakes, windshield wipers, defroster, and radiator are especially important for winter driving.
  • Keep your windows clear. Don't start driving until the windows are defrosted and clean - even if you're only going a short distance.
  • Watch for danger or slippery spots ahead. Ice may remain on bridges even though the rest of the road is clear. Snow and ice also stick longer in shaded areas.

Correctly operating windshield wipers and defrosters are essential to safety while driving in snow and ice conditions. Properly maintained windshield wipers are a must; there are also special blades available that are better equipped to assist in the removal of snow from the windshield. Defroster effectiveness is essential in the initial clearing of snow and ice from the windshield - and in some instances the rear window when a vehicle is so equipped - and should be checked well in advance of need. In certain cases, a change of the vehicle thermostat will restore appropriate heat to the defroster system.


RV insurance: Winter Storage Steps

- Tuesday, January 05, 2021
Lallis & Higgins Insurance - RV Insurance

Helpful steps to storing your RV during the cold months

As you get ready to park your RV for the winter after an enjoyable season on the road keep in mind these important storage steps:

  • Wash and wax your vehicle to prevent dust or dirt buildup.
  • Disconnect the battery. If the RV is stored in a harsh climate take the battery out and store it in a more moderate, climate-controlled area.
  • Use pads to park your rig with the tires off the ground to prevent soft spots.
  • Turn off pilot lights and turn off the propane at the source.
  • Drain all water from your rig including hot and fresh water tanks, and all hot and cold lines.
  • Turn the refrigerator off, defrost and wipe it dry. Leave the door propped open a little bit so air can circulate.
  • Seal all outside openings to prevent critters from taking up residence inside.
  • Use a breathable cover to avoid condensation forming between the cover and RV, or park it inside a garage or facility. Consult an RV dealer on where to purchase a cover.
  • A few hours of preparation can save you a huge amount of hassle in the long run – and get you back on the road when the season changes and pleasant weather returns.

Need RV Insurance?

Make sure you have RV insurance coverage specialized for your RV. Contact Lallis & Higgins Insurance.

Source: foremost.com


Always Have a Designated Driver!

- Monday, December 28, 2020
Lallis & Higgins Insurance, Quincy, Weymouth, MA

Give the Gift of Safe Driving This Holiday Season

For many, the holidays are a time of giving, and one of the greatest gifts is sober driving.

Once again this holiday season, NHTSA is partnering with law enforcement in your hometown to spread the messages: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over and If You Feel Different, You Drive Different — Drive High Get a DUI. The campaign runs from December 18 through January 1 and aims to educate people about the dangers and consequences of driving drunk and high, and that law enforcement will be stepping up patrols to get impaired drivers off the roads.

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

Drunk driving is a problem on our nation’s roads every day, but it’s more prevalent during the holidays. During the New Year’s and Christmas periods in 2018, there were 285 drunk-driving-related fatalities. These deaths were 100% preventable. In 2018, there were 10,511 people killed nationwide in drunk-driving crashes, accounting for nearly one-third of the crash fatalities that year. The tragedy of these deaths is felt year-round, but for many, most strongly during the holidays.

If You Feel Different, You Drive Different - Drive High Get a DUI

Like drunk driving, drug-impaired driving is illegal in all 50 states. In 2017, 45% of the drivers killed in fatal crashes who were tested for drugs, tested positive. Whether the drug is obtained legally or illegally, drug-impaired driving can be deadly for drivers, passengers, and others on the road.

Tips for Getting Home Safely

If you have a holiday gathering on your calendar, make smart choices and plan out how you’re going to get home safely once the celebration ends. If you are the designated driver, make a commitment to 100% sobriety to keep you and your friends safe. If you see an impaired driver on the road, contact local law enforcement immediately. Doing so could save the life of the driver, passenger, and others on the road. And, if you have a friend who is about to drive impaired, take away their keys and help them make arrangements to get home safely — it will be the greatest gift you ever give them.

As we've seen since the public health emergency began, drivers are making riskier decisions when they're behind the wheel — including drinking and driving. As the year comes to a close and a new one begins, make it a point to drive sober every day.

Source: nhtsa.gov


Warm Holiday Greetings To You All

- Monday, December 21, 2020
Happy Holidays From Lallis & Higgins Insurance

Warm Holiday greetings to you all. We write this note to you with joyous confidence that 2021 will bring happier, healthy, and more profitable days to us all! That wish is certainly a cause for optimistic celebration this Holiday season.

Our Holiday gift to you is the gift of small business in your community. To be able to buy locally is a true gift to your neighborhood as well as to your family and friends. We hope that everyone reading this takes a measured effort to buy local to the fullest extent possible, not only during this Holiday season but going forward as well.

Buying local is one of the best gifts you can give to your neighbors and your community. Visit a local restaurant, salon, store, or shop for better relationships and better customer service; but more so you can shake the owner’s hand and wish them the best in 2021 and beyond. That will be a gift for you both. Help make this a joyous holiday for everyone: Give the gift of your business to a local business.

We wish you and your entire family happiness, health, and warmth this Holiday season. Our warmest regards to you all.


Shop Local This Holiday Season In Boston

- Monday, December 14, 2020

Boston's artists and creative businesses have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic this year, and they need our support now more than ever.

Shopping local for the holidays is a great way to alleviate some of the financial losses and hardships the arts community has faced. Here are some great options to explore when searching for holiday gifts this year:

  1. The Boston Women's Market Holiday Shop features a vast array of gifts and artwork created by women artists, makers and business owners in New England.
  2. Harvard Ed Portal's Allston-Brighton Winter Market is happening virtually this year. The marketplace celebrates local creative entrepreneurship by uniting buyers with fine art and handcrafted gifts. In addition to physical artwork, this year the market will also feature experiences like workshops and interactive online programming.
  3. Dorchester Art Project's new storefront at 1486 Dorchester Ave. features a variety of vinyl, tapes, clothing, and visual art by local artists. It's open Wednesdays through Saturdays this month from 12-8 p.m. and Sundays from 12-6 p.m.
  4. Black Market is hosting Black Joy Market at 2136 Washington Street in Roxbury every Saturday from November 28 through December 19. Experience a curated selection of local vendors while listening to a holiday playlist composed by Roxbury Sound System.
  5. SOWA's Winter Pop-Up hosted by Wyllo will feature items by local female artists and makers. The pop-up is located directly across the street from Wyllo's main boutique at 65 Thayer Street, and will run Wednesdays through Sundays from 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. until December 20.
  6. CraftBoston Holiday 2020 presented by the Society of Arts + Crafts celebrates craft artists and the work they make. Shop fine handmade goods at the online store and check out some of their virtual events.
  7. GK! Market is a new digital marketplace for local diverse and inclusive businesses. It's free to use, and you can filter by women-owned businesses, LGBTQ-owned businesses, Black-owned businesses, and more.
  8. The Jameson & Thompson Winter Market in Jamaica Plain will bring together 8-10 vendors to show their locally sourced, handmade products every Sunday from Thanksgiving until Christmas.
  9. The Boston Globe, Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, and Small Business Strong are hosting Shop Small Saturday on November 28 from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. This one-day virtual event gives you a chance to browse a broad marketplace and purchase goods and gift cards from local restaurants, shops, and artisans from home.
  10. Attending a virtual event is another great way to support Boston's arts community during this time. We have a list of upcoming virtual events, and we also encourage you to take a look at ArtsBoston's virtual events calendar.

December is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

- Monday, December 07, 2020
Lallis & Higgins Insurance, Quincy, Weymouth, MA

We would like to remind you to celebrate safely this holiday season. We stand with all those who have known the tragic consequences of drugged or drunk driving, and we rededicate ourselves to preventing it this December and throughout the year.

Impaired driving includes distracted driving, drugged driving, and drunk driving.

Why do we recognize National Impaired Driving Prevention Month?

In an average year, 30 million Americans drive drunk, and 10 million Americans drive impaired by illicit drugs.

A survey by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) revealed that 13.2 percent of all people aged 16 or older drove under the influence of alcohol and 4.3 percent drove under the influence of illicit drugs during the past year.

Furthermore, rates of impaired driving differed dramatically by age.

  • While 11.8 percent of people aged 26 and older drove drunk, 19.5 percent of people aged 16 to 25 drove drunk.
  • And, 2.8 percent of the older group drove drugged, while 11.4 percent of younger drivers did so.

December seems particularly suited to this observation because traffic fatalities that involve impaired drivers increase significantly during the Christmas and New Year’s holiday periods.

  • On average, 25 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes per day during December 2010.
  • Young adults are among those at greatest risk for driving impaired. During December 2010, drivers 21 to 34 years old were alcohol impaired and involved in fatal crashes at a higher percentage than any other age group.

All 50 States and the District of Columbia enforce the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years. NHTSA asks minors to avoid alcohol, and encourages parents and other caregivers to make a new or renewed commitment to never cater a party to underage drinking. If someone you know is drinking, do not let that person get behind the wheel. If you see an impaired driver on the road, contact law enforcement. Your actions may save someone's life, and inaction could cost a life. Families play an essential part in stopping impaired driving. By talking about the risks and setting clear expectations, parents and other caregivers can help their children stay safe, sober, and focused on the road.

Prevention Resources and Toolkits:

  • Traffic Safety Marketing – a website with free campaign posters, TV/radio/web ads, and other resources, including more about NHTSA’s Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving(link is external) and Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaigns.
  • Too Smart to Start – a website dedicated with evidence-based approaches to help youth, families, educators, and communities prevent underage alcohol use and its related problems.
  • Stop Underage Drinking – a comprehensive portal of federal resources for information on underage drinking and ideas for combating this issue.
  • Teen Drugged Driving: Parent, Coalition and Community Group Activity Guide (PDF) – This guide provides coalitions, prevention groups and parent organizations with: the facts on the dangers and extent of teen and young adult drugged driving; parent and community activities for effective prevention; resources to further assist in prevention activities.
  • The National Criminal Justice Reference Service compilation of resources on impaired driving, including general information, enforcement, and prevention, in observation and recognition of National Impaired Driving Prevention Month.

youth.gov


Looking to Get into the Holiday Spirit with the Family this Winter?

- Monday, November 30, 2020
Lallis & Higgins - Holiday Events

There are many holiday light events to visit this year – here is a list of some of our favorites:

Middleboro Festival of lights Drive Through

The Middleborough Tourism Committee will be hosting its 7th Annual Festival of Lights on December 12, 13,19 and 20 from 4:00 pm to 9:00 pm at the Boston/Cape Cod KOA in Middleborough, MA. Unlike previous years, 2020 will be a drive-thru only event.

GILLETTE STADIUM HOLIDAY MAGIC OF LIGHTS-Drive Through

Nov. 13th – Jan. 2nd, 2021; Monday – Thursday 5pm – 10 pm. Friday – Sunday 5pm – 11pm. Magic of Lights is a dazzling, drive-through holiday lights experience featuring favorite holiday scenes and characters of the season using the latest LED technology and digital animations. Experience Magic of Lights from the comfort and safety of your own car as you wind through the sparkling path of Foxborough’s favorite holiday tradition.

Marshfield Holiday Light Show at Fairgrounds Drive Through

The show is open evenings beginning at 5pm sharp, select dates November 19 – December 30, 2020 and tickets can be purchased online through the “buy tickets” button, or at the door! The Marshfield Holiday Light Show https://boldmedia.ticketspice.com/marshfield-holiday-light-show> will feature dozens of dazzling displays to delight the entire family.

GREATER BOSTON CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS Drive Through

The Waltham Lions Drive-Through Holiday Light Show also known as Greater Boston Celebration of Lights will be held November 27 – January 3rd! Bring the kids for a great holiday night out!

Winter Wonderland Lights Drive Through at Southwick Zoo Mendon

Take a magical journey through Southwick’s Zoo with friends and family to view spectacular holiday lights! This year’s 2020 Winter Wonderland will be a drive thru, so guests will stay cozy and warm in their vehicles as they venture through the zoo. The holiday lights fun is from November 27th-January 3rd Wednesday-Sunday: 4:30 pm – 8:30 pm

LA SALETTE SHRINE FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS

Held Nightly November 26th thru January 3 rd The lights will begin at 5:00 PM on November 26 (Thanksgiving) and run from 5-9 pm through January 3, 2021. Due to the pandemic, this year all visitors to the Shrine will be required to wear a face mask and practice social distancing at all times.

Santa’s Christmas Lights Drive Through – HANSON MA

Santa called and still wants to come to Hanson and get a picture with everyone, so join Santa on Friday December 11th and Saturday December 12th from 5pm-9pm for a Christmas Lights Drive-Thru.


Thanksgiving Reflections from Our Team to Yours

- Monday, November 23, 2020
Thanksgiving Reflections from Our Team to Yours

We have all been challenged this year. But, never have we felt closer to our family, staff, customers, and vendors. For this we can give Thanks. The Covid-19 pandemic challenged our business as it did each and every business across our great nation. But, we would like to share with you the positives that came out of this experience.

Our families, our staff, our customers, and our vendors all remind us of the blessing it is to own and operate. The support that you have all provided, and continue to provide, during one of the most troubling and challenging times in American history is nothing short of humbling. That we in our own way returned some of that support to you has us arriving this Thanksgiving season with a deeper appreciation for our relationship with you. We move forward with an extraordinary focus to ensure that the quality of our service meets your needs, expectations, and earns your continued and highly valued trust. We do this with confidence that, together, we all will make it through the unique challenges that lay ahead.

In many ways we have more to be thankful for this year than ever before. This Thanksgiving season, we continue to reflect, recognize, give thanks, and be warmed by you all. As always, we invite you to contact us anytime with ideas, questions, and/or concerns. Thank you, and sincere "Happy Thanksgiving" wishes to you all!



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